Younger You Blog

20
Apr

Original Article By Elise Minton

You may love the way your doctor wields his or her needle to inject your favorite fillers and injectables, giving you the look you’ve always wanted. But for the most part, doctors like to use these products off-label, meaning for a purpose (albeit safe) other than what they are FDA-approved for. We asked six expert injectors what their favorite under-the-radar uses are for injectables and fillers—their answers may surprise you.

To diminish the look of cellulite and dimples
New York dermatologist Gervaise Gerstner, MD, likes to use filler to treat dimples and cellulites on the thighs. “There are a plethora of perfectly sculpted ladies who are 99.99 percent perfect but they obsess over very small dimples or fat pockets. When we use filler to fill in the divots or dimples, it also helps to lift the skin so the appearance of some of that superficial crepiness and cellulite is diminished.”  


03
Apr

Original Article By Sarah Kinonen

No matter how many bicep curls I manage to squeeze into my beloved Barry's Bootcamp class, the seemingly endless reps never to seem to be nearly enough to sculpt the chiseled arms of my dreams. Blame it on my incessant need for lean, long limbs—along with my admitted penchant for dessert—but regardless, regular old reps just aren't cutting it right now. Which is why news about CoolSculpting, an FDA-approved, non-invasive procedure that freezes off fat cells—up to 25 percent—causing them to die, piqued my interest. Because originally, it was developed and approved only for specific areas of the body such as the abdomen and flanks. Now, Coolsculpting for your arms is an option, too.

The Coolsculpting procedure was created by Zeltiq, a medical technology company, in 2010—and has only gained in popularity in the seven years since its inception. Now you can find the treatment offered not only at doctor's offices, but at medical spas as well—and sometimes, with a Groupon-esque code for it all. But again, it was initially only approved for use on certain body parts—arms not included. Until this week, that is, when the FDA approved its use for removal of upper arm fat.